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Opportunity at Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)

Machine Learning of Clues to New Cyberattacks from Honeypots and other Forensic Data

Location

Naval Postgraduate School, Engineering, Applied Sciences and Computer Science

RO# Location
62.10.03.B5419 Monterey, CA 939435138

Advisers

name email phone
Neil Charles Rowe ncrowe@nps.edu 831.656.2462

Description

Research involves developing ways of detecting new kinds of cyberattacks using honeypots (decoy digital systems), especially those simulating cyber-physical systems.  We are collecting network-traffic data using various kinds of deception and are trying to find patterns in it using machine-learning techniques.  We are particularly interesed in methods to subvert machine learning with manipulated data ("adversarial machine learning").  Related work focuses on disk-drive forensics.

N. C. Rowe, Identifying forensically uninteresting files in a large corpus.  EAI Endorsed Transactions on Security and Safety, Vol. 16, No. 7, article e2, 2016.

N. C. Rowe, Honeypot deception tactics.  Chapter 3 in E. Al-Shaer, J. Wei, K. Hamlen, and C. Wang (Eds.), Autonomous Cyber Deception: Reasoning, Adaptive Planning, and Evaluation of HoneyThings, Springer, Chaum, Switzerland, 2018, pp. 35-45.

J. S. Dean and N. C. Rowe, Utility of user roles in comparing network flow behaviors.  Proc. Intl. Conf. on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence, December 2018, Las Vegas, NV, USA.

 

Keywords:
Honeypots; Data mining; Intrusion-detection system; Information warfare;

Eligibility

Citizenship:  Open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents
Level:  Open to Postdoctoral and Senior applicants

Stipend

Base Stipend Travel Allotment Supplementation
$67,000.00 $3,000.00

Experience Supplement:
Postdoctoral and Senior Associates will receive an appropriately higher stipend based on the number of years of experience past their PhD.

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