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Opportunity at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Dynamic, In Situ and Operando Electron Microscopy for GHz Materials Science

Location

Material Measurement Laboratory, Office of Data and Informatics

RO# Location
50.64.10.B8248 Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Please note: This Agency only participates in the February and August reviews.

Advisers

name email phone
June W Lau june.lau@nist.gov 301.975.5711

Description

Many materials in use for device applications such as sensors, resonators, or filters, are prized for their non-equilibrium qualities. In order to better exploit transitory phenomenon of applied materials, our program investigates materials dynamics in situ and operando at operational speeds in order to understand the real-time materials responses in operational regime of MHz to GHz. To accomplish this, we use a unique GHz stroboscopic transmission electron microscope (DOI: 10.1063/1.5131758).

The program’s areas of focus include time-resolved electron microscopy, in situ and in operando techniques and hardware development. Additionally, we encourage the exploration of all possible operation parameter spaces of electron microscopes, so that microscopy instruments may be modified for the benefit of new measurement modalities. Overlapping opportunities may be available with our sister program “Machine learning on facility-scale data and autonomous electron microscopy” (C0708). Creative, non-conventional thinking in the field of electron microscopy is sought to build new measurement capabilities or microscopy instrumentation that can address the challenges associated with non-equilibrium materials science.

Keywords:
Time-resolved; Dynamic; In situ; In operando; Electron microscopy;

Eligibility

Citizenship:  Open to U.S. citizens
Level:  Open to Postdoctoral applicants

Stipend

Base Stipend Travel Allotment Supplementation
$74,950.00 $3,000.00
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