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RAP Lab Opportunities at NIST

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Opportunity at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Using Sensory Perception to Improve Human-Robot Interaction

Location

Engineering Laboratory, Intelligent Systems Division

RO# Location
50.73.51.B7194 Gaithersburg, MD

Please note: This Agency only participates in the February and August reviews.

Advisers

Name E-mail Phone
Shneier, Michael Oliver michael.shneier@nist.gov 301.975.3421

Description

There is a growing demand for robot systems that collaborate with people. For robots to accomplish these new applications, especially in small- and medium-sized enterprises, they must ensure safety and effectiveness of human workers while efficiently carrying out the joint tasks. A major enabler will be the use of sensors to take the place of safety barriers and to improve the awareness of the robot about the locations and intentions of the people it collaborates with. We are interested in using sensors that can be positioned in the environment surrounding a manipulator, or within the manipulator itself, and algorithms that process the sensor data to determine situations when the robot needs to alter its behavior to protect people or to work more effectively with them. We are also working on developing performance measures that will guarantee the safety of the sensory system and new standards for robot safety in this more flexible environment.

Available resources include multiple robot manipulators and actuators within a full-scale industrial robotic test bed, and video cameras, range cameras, laser-, and stereo-based range sensors. Also available are high precision sensors that can measure six degree of freedom pose ([x,y,z] and yaw, pitch, roll) of static or moving components to provide ground truth.

 

Keywords:
Human-robot interaction; Robotics; Safety; Sensors;

Eligibility

Citizenship:  Open to U.S. citizens
Level:  Open to Regular applicants
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