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Opportunity at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Measurement of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Location

Physical Measurement Laboratory, Applied Physics Division

RO# Location
50.68.62.B7537 Boulder, CO

Please note: This Agency only participates in the February and August reviews.

Advisers

Name E-mail Phone
Brown, Steven W. swbrown@nist.gov 301.975.5167
Gillis, Keith Alan keith.gillis@nist.gov 301.975.2468
Johnson, B. Carol cjohnson@nist.gov 301.975.2322
Johnson, Aaron Nathaniel aaron.johnson@nist.gov 301.975.5954
Moldover, M. R. michael.moldover@nist.gov 301.975.2459
Plusquellic, David Francis david.plusquellic@nist.gov 303-497-6089
Rice, Joseph P. joe.rice@nist.gov 301.975.2133

Description

Research opportunities are available to advance the measurement of greenhouse-gas emissions from point sources such as power plant stacks and large-area sources such as landfills, farms, and oceans. Accurate greenhouse-gas measurements are required to improve the quality and comparability of emissions inventories; to reduce the discrepancy between the measured rate of increase of the global atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and the predicted increase based on summing the individual emission sources and sinks; and to support voluntary and involuntary efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current research efforts focus on improving in-situ and standoff methods for measuring the flux of carbon dioxide from smoke stacks to support regulation of greenhouse gas emissions and to enable the use of stacks as standard carbon dioxide sources for calibrating standoff carbon sensors; developing more stable and accurate sensors for deployment in national and international networks of ground sensors; improving the measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from satellites, including indirect measurements based on land-use assessment; advancing the application of differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) for the measurement of greenhouse gas emissions; and improving in-situ, air, and space-based measurements of organic and inorganic ocean-carbon levels.

Research opportunities are available to advance the measurement of greenhouse-gas emissions from point sources such as power plant stacks and distrubuted area sources such as landfills, farms, and oceans. Accurate greenhouse-gas measurements are required to improve the quality and comparability of emissions inventories; to reduce the discrepancy between the measured rate of increase of the global atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and the predicted increase based on summing the individual emission sources and sinks; and to support voluntary and involuntary efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current research efforts focus on improving in-situ and standoff methods for measuring the flux of carbon dioxide from smoke stacks to support regulation of greenhouse gas emissions and to enable the use of stacks as standard carbon dioxide sources for calibrating standoff carbon sensors; developing more stable and accurate sensors for deployment in national and international networks of ground sensors; improving the measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from satellites, including indirect measurements based on land-use assessment; advancing the application of differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) for the measurement of greenhouse gas emissions; and improving in-situ, air, and space-based measurements of organic and inorganic ocean-carbon levels. Resources: For DIAL experiments, an electro-optic modulator based spectrometer for perfoming rapid scans (up to 40 kHz) using a waveform generator in the region from 1.59 to 1.65 μm, a 20 Hz YAG pumped OPO and 10 kHz, 300 W (peak) fiber amplifier operating near 1.6 μm and a 10” telescope/PMT photon counting system for absorption measurements over integrated paths to/from hard targets or over range resolved paths to/from atmospheric aerosol particles. Other systems include a PCIe based acquisition system (200 MS/sec on two channels) for streaming of data from the PMT or other sensitive detectors, two independent DFB laser systems, a dual Mach-Zehnder waveguide based I/Q modulator for fast frequency control of the seed laser frequency. 

http://www.nist.gov/pml/div686/molec-biophotonics/index.cfm 

 

Keywords:
Biophotonics; Photonics; LIDAR; DIAL; Carbon dioxide; Air monitoring; Greenhouse gases emissions; Climate change;

Eligibility

Citizenship:  Open to U.S. citizens
Level:  Open to Postdoctoral applicants
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